\r\n\r\nRumors of a strike are circulating across traditional and social media channels, but Spirit’s flight attendants’ union denies there is a formal labor action. The AFA said in a written statement yesterday: “Spirit Airlines is experiencing operational issues causing flight delays and cancellations due to weather, schedule month change over, and IT outages. A few news outlets have incorrectly reported that this may be due to a strike. This is not true. There is no flight attendant strike. Crews are not the issue. Management is proactively cancelling flights today to recover the operation and prevent further disruption for passengers.\"\r\n\r\nIndustry executives in the US with knowledge of the matter explained to Finance Colombia that Spirit pilots are not on a formal strike, but morale issues may be causing an informal revolt as pilots have been pushed to the limits with regards to overtime and workload. Spirit has been rapidly expanding its route network and taking deliveries of new aircraft in the midst of a pilot shortage. Many airlines paused recruiting and training of new pilots during the COVID pandemic in 2020, leaving them unprepared for the current surge in discretionary travel. Spirit also lacks a network of agreements with competitor airlines to reroute passengers in the event of cancellations.\r\n
“We almost went out of our way to poke the customer in the eye. And once a business gets more competitive, you can’t do that anymore,”—Former Spirit Airlines CEO Bob Fornaro
\r\nIt can take up to 10 pilots per aircraft to keep a narrow-body aircraft like the Airbus A320s that Spirit flies fully utilized. All airlines in the US are facing this issue of pilot shortages, the executive said, leading to American Airlines’ massive proactive flight cancellations earlier this summer, as an example.\r\n

A sign of things to come?

\r\nAs Spirit and other airlines battle to poach pilots from the regional carriers, the traditional pipeline of fresh commercial pilots leaving the US Air Force &  Navy is no longer producing enough airmen to replace existing pilots, or to add pilots in the midst of significant growth among airlines. The same challenges leading to Spirit’s operational fiasco may soon spread across the industry. As a sign of things to come, United Airlines upped its new plane order to 120 A321 Airbus aircraft, while placing an order for 200 Boeing 737 Max aircraft last month. All these new planes will need new pilots, airframe & powerplant mechanics, ground crew, gate agents, and administrative staff. Over the past weekend, American Airlines also canceled over 270 flights, or approximately 9% of its schedule, with at least 120 flights canceled due to lack of crew. Thunderstorms did affect the Dallas, Texas metropolitan area over the weekend, affecting American Airlines, and also Southwest Airlines, who had over 1,000 flights delayed, but only 44 cancelled, due to thunderstorms, said the low-cost carrier. While all cancellations and delays inevitably frustrate passengers, Spirit seems to lack the customer service infrastructure to deal with itinerary adjustments, passenger care, and even the basic communications of the larger, more mature carriers.\r\n

Growing Pains?

\r\nAirline industry observers remember the forced resignation of JetBlue founder and then-CEO David Neeleman after the airline’s infamous 2007 “Valentine’s Day Massacre” that saw passengers stranded on the runways of New York’s JFK International Airport for up to 11 hours that February 14. While the airline canceled half of its 500 scheduled flights that day, and over 1,000 that week, it was not the cancellations that led to Neeleman’s dismissal—after all, snowstorms & icing conditions happen, and safety must always take priority—but JetBlue’s failure to adequately communicate with and take care of passengers that had been stranded, delayed, or trapped on an aircraft going nowhere for several hours. Shortly after the debacle, Allen Adamson of public relations agency Landor Associates told Forbes: \"It’s easier to be different as a small company. That worked for many years, but when [JetBlue] became a big airline, its operations could not live up to delivering its brand experience because the company was built around a different philosophy.\"\r\n
Spirit Airlines’ on-time performance in Q2, 2021 was 78.3% with a load factor of 84.4%. The company reported a $288 million USD quarterly loss on $859.3 million in revenues, and $2.2 billion USD of cash on hand.
\r\nAircraft safety and maintenance is highly regulated, and all FAR Part 121 carriers (regularly scheduled airlines) must meet strict standards, however customer service responsiveness is not regulated, and airlines adhere to wildly varying standards and philosophies. Some airlines that attempt to provide the bare minimum of passenger support may find the policy backfiring on them as it both damages the brand and destroys morale of those support staff left to face angry mobs. Even ostensibly full-service airlines that don’t pay attention to passenger experience may suffer. Avianca won a battle with its pilot’s union only to lose the war as many pilots quit and others wouldn’t show up after a nasty labor dispute. The extensive disruptions led passengers to flee the airline that soon filed for bankruptcy. United Airlines remains infamous for beating up doctors and \r\n\r\nRumors of a strike are circulating across traditional and social media channels, but Spirit’s flight attendants’ union denies there is a formal labor action. The AFA said in a written statement yesterday: “Spirit Airlines is experiencing operational issues causing flight delays and cancellations due to weather, schedule month change over, and IT outages. A few news outlets have incorrectly reported that this may be due to a strike. This is not true. There is no flight attendant strike. Crews are not the issue. Management is proactively cancelling flights today to recover the operation and prevent further disruption for passengers.\"\r\n\r\nIndustry executives in the US with knowledge of the matter explained to Finance Colombia that Spirit pilots are not on a formal strike, but morale issues may be causing an informal revolt as pilots have been pushed to the limits with regards to overtime and workload. Spirit has been rapidly expanding its route network and taking deliveries of new aircraft in the midst of a pilot shortage. Many airlines paused recruiting and training of new pilots during the COVID pandemic in 2020, leaving them unprepared for the current surge in discretionary travel. Spirit also lacks a network of agreements with competitor airlines to reroute passengers in the event of cancellations.\r\n
“We almost went out of our way to poke the customer in the eye. And once a business gets more competitive, you can’t do that anymore,”—Former Spirit Airlines CEO Bob Fornaro
\r\nIt can take up to 10 pilots per aircraft to keep a narrow-body aircraft like the Airbus A320s that Spirit flies fully utilized. All airlines in the US are facing this issue of pilot shortages, the executive said, leading to American Airlines’ massive proactive flight cancellations earlier this summer, as an example.\r\n

A sign of things to come?

\r\nAs Spirit and other airlines battle to poach pilots from the regional carriers, the traditional pipeline of fresh commercial pilots leaving the US Air Force &  Navy is no longer producing enough airmen to replace existing pilots, or to add pilots in the midst of significant growth among airlines. The same challenges leading to Spirit’s operational fiasco may soon spread across the industry. As a sign of things to come, United Airlines upped its new plane order to 120 A321 Airbus aircraft, while placing an order for 200 Boeing 737 Max aircraft last month. All these new planes will need new pilots, airframe & powerplant mechanics, ground crew, gate agents, and administrative staff. Over the past weekend, American Airlines also canceled over 270 flights, or approximately 9% of its schedule, with at least 120 flights canceled due to lack of crew. Thunderstorms did affect the Dallas, Texas metropolitan area over the weekend, affecting American Airlines, and also Southwest Airlines, who had over 1,000 flights delayed, but only 44 cancelled, due to thunderstorms, said the low-cost carrier. While all cancellations and delays inevitably frustrate passengers, Spirit seems to lack the customer service infrastructure to deal with itinerary adjustments, passenger care, and even the basic communications of the larger, more mature carriers.\r\n

Growing Pains?

\r\nAirline industry observers remember the forced resignation of JetBlue founder and then-CEO David Neeleman after the airline’s infamous 2007 “Valentine’s Day Massacre” that saw passengers stranded on the runways of New York’s JFK International Airport for up to 11 hours that February 14. While the airline canceled half of its 500 scheduled flights that day, and over 1,000 that week, it was not the cancellations that led to Neeleman’s dismissal—after all, snowstorms & icing conditions happen, and safety must always take priority—but JetBlue’s failure to adequately communicate with and take care of passengers that had been stranded, delayed, or trapped on an aircraft going nowhere for several hours. Shortly after the debacle, Allen Adamson of public relations agency Landor Associates told Forbes: \"It’s easier to be different as a small company. That worked for many years, but when [JetBlue] became a big airline, its operations could not live up to delivering its brand experience because the company was built around a different philosophy.\"\r\n
Spirit Airlines’ on-time performance in Q2, 2021 was 78.3% with a load factor of 84.4%. The company reported a $288 million USD quarterly loss on $859.3 million in revenues, and $2.2 billion USD of cash on hand.
\r\nAircraft safety and maintenance is highly regulated, and all FAR Part 121 carriers (regularly scheduled airlines) must meet strict standards, however customer service responsiveness is not regulated, and airlines adhere to wildly varying standards and philosophies. Some airlines that attempt to provide the bare minimum of passenger support may find the policy backfiring on them as it both damages the brand and destroys morale of those support staff left to face angry mobs. Even ostensibly full-service airlines that don’t pay attention to passenger experience may suffer. Avianca won a battle with its pilot’s union only to lose the war as many pilots quit and others wouldn’t show up after a nasty labor dispute. The extensive disruptions led passengers to flee the airline that soon filed for bankruptcy. United Airlines remains infamous for beating up doctors and \r\n\r\nRumors of a strike are circulating across traditional and social media channels, but Spirit’s flight attendants’ union denies there is a formal labor action. The AFA said in a written statement yesterday: “Spirit Airlines is experiencing operational issues causing flight delays and cancellations due to weather, schedule month change over, and IT outages. A few news outlets have incorrectly reported that this may be due to a strike. This is not true. There is no flight attendant strike. Crews are not the issue. Management is proactively cancelling flights today to recover the operation and prevent further disruption for passengers.\"\r\n\r\nIndustry executives in the US with knowledge of the matter explained to Finance Colombia that Spirit pilots are not on a formal strike, but morale issues may be causing an informal revolt as pilots have been pushed to the limits with regards to overtime and workload. Spirit has been rapidly expanding its route network and taking deliveries of new aircraft in the midst of a pilot shortage. Many airlines paused recruiting and training of new pilots during the COVID pandemic in 2020, leaving them unprepared for the current surge in discretionary travel. Spirit also lacks a network of agreements with competitor airlines to reroute passengers in the event of cancellations.\r\n
“We almost went out of our way to poke the customer in the eye. And once a business gets more competitive, you can’t do that anymore,”—Former Spirit Airlines CEO Bob Fornaro
\r\nIt can take up to 10 pilots per aircraft to keep a narrow-body aircraft like the Airbus A320s that Spirit flies fully utilized. All airlines in the US are facing this issue of pilot shortages, the executive said, leading to American Airlines’ massive proactive flight cancellations earlier this summer, as an example.\r\n

A sign of things to come?

\r\nAs Spirit and other airlines battle to poach pilots from the regional carriers, the traditional pipeline of fresh commercial pilots leaving the US Air Force &  Navy is no longer producing enough airmen to replace existing pilots, or to add pilots in the midst of significant growth among airlines. The same challenges leading to Spirit’s operational fiasco may soon spread across the industry. As a sign of things to come, United Airlines upped its new plane order to 120 A321 Airbus aircraft, while placing an order for 200 Boeing 737 Max aircraft last month. All these new planes will need new pilots, airframe & powerplant mechanics, ground crew, gate agents, and administrative staff. Over the past weekend, American Airlines also canceled over 270 flights, or approximately 9% of its schedule, with at least 120 flights canceled due to lack of crew. Thunderstorms did affect the Dallas, Texas metropolitan area over the weekend, affecting American Airlines, and also Southwest Airlines, who had over 1,000 flights delayed, but only 44 cancelled, due to thunderstorms, said the low-cost carrier. While all cancellations and delays inevitably frustrate passengers, Spirit seems to lack the customer service infrastructure to deal with itinerary adjustments, passenger care, and even the basic communications of the larger, more mature carriers.\r\n

Growing Pains?

\r\nAirline industry observers remember the forced resignation of JetBlue founder and then-CEO David Neeleman after the airline’s infamous 2007 “Valentine’s Day Massacre” that saw passengers stranded on the runways of New York’s JFK International Airport for up to 11 hours that February 14. While the airline canceled half of its 500 scheduled flights that day, and over 1,000 that week, it was not the cancellations that led to Neeleman’s dismissal—after all, snowstorms & icing conditions happen, and safety must always take priority—but JetBlue’s failure to adequately communicate with and take care of passengers that had been stranded, delayed, or trapped on an aircraft going nowhere for several hours. Shortly after the debacle, Allen Adamson of public relations agency Landor Associates told Forbes: \"It’s easier to be different as a small company. That worked for many years, but when [JetBlue] became a big airline, its operations could not live up to delivering its brand experience because the company was built around a different philosophy.\"\r\n
Spirit Airlines’ on-time performance in Q2, 2021 was 78.3% with a load factor of 84.4%. The company reported a $288 million USD quarterly loss on $859.3 million in revenues, and $2.2 billion USD of cash on hand.
\r\nAircraft safety and maintenance is highly regulated, and all FAR Part 121 carriers (regularly scheduled airlines) must meet strict standards, however customer service responsiveness is not regulated, and airlines adhere to wildly varying standards and philosophies. Some airlines that attempt to provide the bare minimum of passenger support may find the policy backfiring on them as it both damages the brand and destroys morale of those support staff left to face angry mobs. Even ostensibly full-service airlines that don’t pay attention to passenger experience may suffer. Avianca won a battle with its pilot’s union only to lose the war as many pilots quit and others wouldn’t show up after a nasty labor dispute. The extensive disruptions led passengers to flee the airline that soon filed for bankruptcy. United Airlines remains infamous for beating up doctors and
Finance Colombia